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5G NR is the fifth generation of wireless technology and “NR” stands for a new radio interface and radio access technology for cellular networks — a physical connection method for radio-based communication. Other kinds of radio access technologies include Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and 4G LTE.

5G NR is designed to support fibre-equivalent bandwidth transmissions required for data demanding applications like streaming video, as well as low-bandwidth transmissions used in machine-to-machine communications at increased capacity where needed.

5G NR will also support transmissions with extremely low latency requirements – for example applied to vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications which is a vital prerequisite in those settings

Like its predecessors, the 5G NR standard was created by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP). The first iteration of 5G NR appeared in 3GPP Release 15.

The 5G NR standard supports a number of low-, mid- and high-frequency bands.

Frequency range 1, which includes frequency bands that are less than 6 gigahertz;

Frequency range 2, which includes bands with a low range combined with a high bandwidth and mmWave.

5G NR uses frequency bands in two frequency ranges:

Frequency Range 1 (FR1), for bands within 410 MHz – 7125 MHz

Frequency Range 2 (FR2), for bands within 24250 MHz – 52600 MHz

 

Benefits of 5G NR

In a growing connected world, 5G will certainly play a major role in industries and society including more capacity for wireless users, improved data rates and more importantly low lag and latency.

5G NR deployment modes

As 5G NR is being rolled out there are currently 2 Deployment Modes that are implemented. The two modes depends on several factors, including the existing infrastructure.

Non-Standalone (NSA)

Essentially, a “Hybrid” as some of the 4G LTE infrastructure stays in place, while the radio frequency side of 5G NR presents the beneficial characteristics. Advantages are a more speedier rollout as current 4G facilities are reused. Non-Standalone 5G NR will provide increased data-bandwidth by using two new radio frequency ranges:

Frequency Range 1 (450 MHz to 6000 MHz) – This band overlaps with 4G LTE frequencies and is called as sub-6 GHz. Bands are numbered from 1 to 255.

Frequency Range 2 (24 GHz to 52 GHz) – This is the mm-Wave frequency band. Bands are numbered from 257 to 511.

Standalone (SA)

For standalone mode, the full 5G NR technical standard is deployed. No residual 4G technical underpinnings are involved. For example, refers to using 5G cells for both signalling and information transfer. It includes the new 5G Packet Core architecture instead of relying on the 4G Evolved Packet Core to allow the deployment of 5G without the LTE network. It is expected to have lower cost, better efficiency, and to assist development of new use cases. However, initial deployment might see slower speeds than existing network due to the allocation of spectrum.

Network Slicing is also a key feature to the 5G network. 5G network slicing will allow MVNO and operators to use a portion of the 5G network spectrum to split and serve various use-cases, including mobile networking, smart homes, IoT, and inventory management. This enables service providers to tailor packages to customers needs for example for “Mission Critical” objectives like remote surgery for the medical industry.

5G network slicing supports enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB), which aims at maximizing the network speeds and data rates while having an acceptable QoS, including reliability and packet-error rates. This portion of the “Slice” will most certainly benefit data demanding applications.

There are three main primary use cases within the 5G NR

Enhanced Mobile Broadband (eMBB): Bandwidth-driven use cases needing high data rates across a mobile wide coverage area. For example 4K Media, AR and VR applications.

Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communications (URLLC): Lowest possible latency and high network reliability for critical applications like autonomous vehicle, remote surgery/healthcare, or time-critical factory automation (e.g. semiconductor fabrication).

Massive Machine Type Communications (mMTC): Providing connectivity to a large number of devices that transmit intermittently a small amount of traffic such as Smart factories that presents this ideal scenario that will produce high productivity and efficiency.

The future of 5G NR is certainly exciting as this 5th generation of cellular technology is constantly evolving and dynamic that promises ground-breaking new capabilities and to unlock the potential of technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Extended Reality (XR) and the Internet of Things (IoT).

With the traits of low latency, increased spectrum and throughput. 5G technology is truly a key enabler of new B2B opportunities and create new emerging markets.

A new era of industrial innovation is here. The industries of the future are all about people creating the products that shape our lives. Siretta offers these solutions to solve your IoT and IIoT challenges. From Modems, Routers and even a vast array of antennas to keep your world connected.

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The table below shows all of the defined bands and the associated frequencies used with 5G NR network.

A2: Denotes UE Receive

A3: Denotes UE Transmit

Band Number 5G Mode 5G Common name Frequency (MHz) Uplink[A 2] (MHz) Downlink[A 3] (MHz)
n1 FDD IMT 2100 1920 – 1980 2110 – 2170
n2 FDD PCS 1900 1850 – 1910 1930 – 1990
n3 FDD DCS 1800 1710 – 1785 1805 – 1880
n5 FDD CLR 850 824 – 849 869 – 894
n7 FDD IMT‑E 2600 2500 – 2570 2620 – 2690
n8 FDD Extended GSM 900 880 – 915 925 – 960
n12 FDD Lower SMH 700 699 – 716 729 – 746
n13 FDD Upper SMH 700 777 – 787 746 – 756
n14 FDD Upper SMH 700 788 – 798 758 – 768
n18 FDD Lower 800 (Japan) 850 815 – 830 860 – 875
n20 FDD Digital Dividend (EU) 800 832 – 862 791 – 821
n24 FDD Upper L‑Band (US) 1600 1626.5 – 1660.5[B 2] 1525 – 1559[B 3]
n25 FDD Extended PCS 1900 1850 – 1915 1930 – 1995
n26 FDD Extended CLR 850 814 – 849 859 – 894
n28 FDD APT 700 703 – 748 758 – 803
n29 SDL Lower SMH 700 N/A 717 – 728
n30 FDD WCS 2300 2305 – 2315 2350 – 2360
n34 TDD IMT 2100 2010 – 2025
n38 TDD IMT‑E[B 4] 2600 2570 – 2620
n39 TDD DCS–IMT Gap 1900 1880 – 1920
n40 TDD S-Band 2300 2300 – 2400
n41 TDD BRS 2500 2496 – 2690
n46 TDD U-NII-1–4 5200 5150 – 5925
n47 TDD U-NII-4 5900 5855 – 5925
n48 TDD CBRS (US) 3500 3550 – 3700
n50 TDD L‑Band (EU) 1500 1432 – 1517
n51 TDD L‑Band Extension (EU) 1500 1427 – 1432
n53 TDD S band 2400 2483.5 – 2495
n65 FDD Extended IMT 2100 1920 – 2010 2110 – 2200
n66 FDD Extended AWS 1700 – 2100 1710 – 1780 2110 – 2200[B 7]
n67 SDL EU 700 700 N/A 738 – 758
n70 FDD Supplementary AWS 2000 1695 – 1710 1995 – 2020
n71 FDD Digital Dividend (US) 600 663 – 698 617 – 652
n74 FDD Lower L‑Band (US) 1500 1427 – 1470 1475 – 1518
n75 SDL L‑Band (EU) 1500 N/A 1432 – 1517
n76 SDL Extended L‑Band (EU) 1500 N/A 1427 – 1432
n77 TDD C-Band 3700 3300 – 4200
n78 TDD C-Band 3500 3300 – 3800
n79 TDD C-Band 4700 4400 – 5000
n80 SUL DCS 1800 1710 – 1785 N/A
n81 SUL Extended GSM 900 880 – 915 N/A
n82 SUL Digital Dividend (EU) 800 832 – 862 N/A
n83 SUL APT 700 703 – 748 N/A
n84 SUL IMT 2100 1920 – 1980 N/A
n85 FDD Extended Lower SMH 700 698 – 716 728 – 746
n86 SUL Extended AWS 1700 1710 – 1780 N/A
n89 SUL CLR 850 824 – 849 N/A
n90 TDD BRS 2500 2496 – 2690
n91 FDD DD (EU) L-Band (EU) 800 – 1500 832 – 862 1427 – 1432
n92 FDD DD (EU) L-Band (EU) 800 – 1500 832 – 862 1432 – 1517
n93 FDD Extended GSM L-Band (EU) 900 – 1500 880 – 915 1427 – 1432
n94 FDD Extended GSM L-Band (EU) 900 – 1500 880 – 915 1432 – 1517
n95 SUL IMT 2100 2010 – 2025 N/A
n96 TDD U-NII-5–9 6000 5925 – 7125
n97 SUL S-Band 2300 2300 – 2400 N/A
n98 SUL DCS–IMT Gap 1900 1880 – 1920 N/A
n99 SUL Upper L‑Band (US) 1600 1626.5 – 1660.5[B 2] N/A
n101 TDD Rail Mobile Radio (RMR) 1900 1900 – 1910
n102 TDD U-NII-5 6200 5925 – 6425